Jazmyn RayAnn

In life and in activism, it took time for Jazmyn RayAnn to apply herself. Once she did, no one could stop her.

Except maybe the police.

Weeks before teenage COVID-19 vaccinations raised the ire of some parents, RayAnn and others tried in vain to approach the school board on masks. When the Regina school board had a scheduled meeting, it was time to make their presence felt.

“We decided to show up to join, thinking, they’re not gonna let us in, but we might as well try, right?” RayAnn said in an interview with the Western Standard.  

“A police officer came up to me and said, ‘They’re not allowing anyone in there. It’s a closed gathering…So here’s what I can do for you. I can go in there and talk to them for you. What was your name?’”

Against her better instincts, RayAnn said who she was. After the officer was unsuccessful at arranging an in-person meeting, he left.

“About 30 minutes later, it went from one cruiser to two cruisers to three cruisers to four cruisers to five cruisers, six cruisers. And he rolls up with all his friends with a ticket in his hand for the [April] 24th rally. And I said, ‘You bugger! You identified me with this whole different regard. And now you’re giving me this ticket because you knew who I am?’ And he’s like, ‘Yep,’ 

“What is the point in that, seriously? But at least they didn’t come to my house.”

Building a home got RayAnn’s life on track.

“After high school, I fell into some bad habits: drinking, partying, and overall wild. I didn’t care about myself. I didn’t have much for standards and I knew I was disappointing myself and my loved ones. It wasn’t until I met Sean that I started cleaning up my act. I got out of the party life, starting making and building a home with my man, and was trying to be the best me I could be,” she wrote on her LinkedIn profile as a fitness coach.

RayAnn has a son, and for the first year of COVID-19 restrictions, she followed all the orders.

“I played the game, I played it safe. I stayed home for two weeks, I pulled my kid out of school, I started doing school from home,” RayAnn recalled.

Her willingness to comply began to unravel after she put her son back in school in the fall.

“The guidelines and the restrictions and the mandates that they have in their welcome package – it was just unnecessary. And that’s when I was like, ‘Hey, this isn’t gonna work. I’m not going to be able to take my kids to school feeling confident that teachers have their best interest when they’re masking them and they can’t even tell me why.’

“I actually asked his superintendent to provide us with information that Sask Health Authority was giving them that made them decided to mandate the masks. And he was like, ‘Oh, we don’t have it, nor can we give it to you.’”

By January, RayAnn had had enough.

“I started losing sleep. I wasn’t looking forward to the future. My kid’s birthday was coming up…and this was now a year since we’ve complied… I was just like, ‘You know what? I’m done with it.’ So I started coming out to these rallies.”

RayAnn’s participation in freedom rallies has already earned her nine tickets. Although her total is three less than that of Tamara Lavoie, RayAnn has been recognized as a leading “freedom fighter” in her own right.

“I’m just heavy in it with them as they’ve been for a whole year. So, I may have came late to the party, but I came in blazing,” she said.

RayAnn has a trainer of her own and is growing her biceps as she learns to lift at the gym. She knows not all she encounters share her passion or perspective.

“I don’t want to convince anyone. I want to educate and have them just open their minds to the idea that there is a second side to the story, a side that they’re not getting told through the media, through the radio, through the schools, through the emails that they get from work….” she said.

“Don’t go get the vaccine, don’t go get tested just because they tell you to. Go look into it first, make that decision for yourself based on your own independent research…

“History repeats itself. And the only way we get into these situations that we’re in now is when they gain the trust of the public, and then put fear into the public to keep them in compliance. And they’ve done it in previous years. Hitler did it, right? So that’s where I’m at.”

Jazmyn RayAnn is the online handle for the subject of this article. Her real name is withheld for professional reasons.

Harding is a Western Standard correspondent based in Saskatchewan

Senior Contributor (Saskatchewan)

Lee Harding is the Senior Saskatchewan Contributor for the Western Standard and Saskatchewan Standard based in the Regina Bureau. He has served as the Saskatchewan Director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

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